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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 551 (some duplicates have been removed)
as solicitor general. nine years ago, they ruled 5 to 4 to uphold the university of michigan law schools limited use of affirmative action. and coming up next on c-span, oral arguments from last week's opening session of the courts full term. this case asks whether courts have jurisdiction to hear lawsuits and forge human rights abuses that occurred out -- for human rights abuses that occurred outside the country. this is an hour. >> we'll hear argument first this term in case 10-1491, kiobel v. royal dutch petroleum. mr. hoffman? >> mr. chief justice, and may it please the court, the plaintiffs in this case received asylum in the united states because of the human rights violations alleged in the complaint. they sued the defendants for their role in these human rights violations in u.s. general personal jurisdiction of our courts. abouts nothing unusual suing a tortfeasor in our -- >> may i ask you about the statement you just made? personal jurisdiction was raised as a defense, right? >> personal jurisdiction was raised as an affirmative defense, but not raised in a motion to dismiss.
identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as supervisors, what if anything would you propose to strength the city's ethics laws. i will start with mr. davis. >> strong ethic laws are essential. what is happening with our sunshine task force and hope davis can speak to this since she recently served on the task force. these need to be strengthened and one problem we have is around enforcement. i would like to see more of the ethical violations of larger committees, some of which are operating, for instance, in some shady areas of law. one was the run he ed run, the committee for mayor ed lee last year and the campaigns that aren't swaying the politics of city, the way the run ed run campaign did. so i think that is one the issues and improving our good government and ethic laws in san francisco. >> miss breed, would you like to address the question? do you want me to repeat it? >> yes. >> sure. a recent chief civil grand jury report, at the request of supervisor campos the city conducted a comparison of laws identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as su
by melanie eversley later. you probably heard what happened in pennsylvania regarding their voter i.d. law and we will talk to her about that. we also want to take time to let you know that on our other channels on the weekend, book- tv and american history tv, we look at cities across the united states. our focus this time around is augusta, maine. not only do you get a sense of meeting the people and learning about individual cities and what makes them interesting, here is a little bit of a preview from tonight's program. [video clip] >> this is the first parish church in brunswick, maine. it is significant to the story of a uncle tom's cabin. in many ways, the story began here. it is here in pew #23 that harriet beecher stowe, by her account, saw the vision of uncle tom being whipped to to death. he is the title character, the hero of her 1852 novel," uncle tom's cabin." the story is that there is -- there was a slave, a good slave, sold by his first kind owner, mr. shelby, and he sold him to pay debts on his plantation through a series of misadventures, you might say, he ends up in the
line. there are many bright lines in the law. now again not every law is susceptible to a bright line but by and large i think it does benefit the public when the laws are clear so that they can easily be followed. >> supervisor cohen: thank you. >> president chiu: supervisor kim. >> supervisor kim: you somewhat addressed this already when you said that it may be challenging for you to address the actual relationship to the office that was determined by the majority of the commission, but since you were sent to represent the commission i thought i would ask, so having read the transcripts several times actually the one question that was not answered to me is what exactly is the relationship to the office? i heard a couple of examples such as the sheriff runs our domestic violence programs and he committed an act of domestic violence. from your understanding of the majority of the commission is that the relationship, or was there another kind of clear delineation of what that relationship to the office was, for specifically counts 4 and 5? >> supervisor kim, i think that was the relati
look at all of the policy concerns, and the case law, it becomes clear that it makes no sense whatsoever to draw the line at the oath of office rather than at the election. it would be contrary to the voter's intent to enhance the ethical responsibilities of their public officials and hold them accountable to imply this two month free zone in between the election and taking the oath of office, where that elected official could do whatever he wanted with no consequences with his public position, until that moment when he walks up to the lectern and raises his hand. it also would lead to absurd results. an elected official could, for example, commit domestic violence on tuesday, and be safe from any official consequences. but if the oath of office is later that day, he couldn't do the same thing on wednesday. that's a completely arbitrary line. it makes no sense whatsoever. it's very different if you draw the line at the election. that makes perfect sense. once an official has been granted the voters trust, then he also has the ethical obligation to protect that trust by not com
duties as chief law enforcement officer in his role administering the city's domestic violence programs. the fact that the relationship test is interpreted by the ethics commission majority to include a subject matter relationship is really very sensible. what happens if you commit misconduct in the very terrain, the very subject matter that you're charged with as a government official is you implicate the public character of your office. if you're the tax collector, and you misrepresent your income on your income taxes, that's not purely private misconduct. that is a matter of public concern because it shows the public that it has a fox in the henhouse, essentially. that's very different, if, for example, you're an animal control officer and you misrepresent your income on your taxes. and think of it in reverse. what if you're an animal control officer. is there a relationship to the duties of your position if you're running a dog fight ring? in your private time? of course there is. no one wants michael vic in control of the animal control department. at the same time, if michael vic
a hundred dollars in state money to pay an employee in her law office. her lawyer say the judge agreed that when she completes her public service he will enter this position of probation before judgment which would lead her without a commission. the same prosecutor says this triggers here suspension from office. he says she will continue to serve her constituents. police in baltimore are working to figure out the identity of the person they found shot multiple times in northeast baltimore. this is before 9:30 last night water -- authorities responded to the 600 block of the dumbarton avenue,. he was taken to the hospital but later died. no word on a motive for possible suspect. >> vehrs hustisford in order of -- we are live at police headquarters. >> police are also looking for a motive. her body was found in a quiet street in northwest baltimore. her family is looking for answers. credit should shoot your her memorial page facebook was more is the son likes. you see the overall, a response on facebook because of the manner, she is an addictive personality. you'll never forget her. >>
from the law. john: congress killing their funding. so acorn is gone except that they are not on. they just changed shapes. as dan epstein of the taxpayer watchdog group cause of action. what do you mean? >> my organization has been looking at acorn in is reprinted affiliate's of the past year, and we have seen that there are now 1704 groups out there, at least some of which including the mutual housing association of new york here in new york city are getting taxpayer dollars. yet we don't know if they're actually doing anything with that money. john: its new groups. not the same thing. >> the same directors, the same tax i.d. numbers, the same employee edification numbers. in many cases the same employees >> congress cuts them off and they just change names. >> i can tell you that when i were to the house oversight committee as an investigator we went to the inspector general's office, and an auditor told the committee staff when we found direct evidence of acorn housing misusing federal grant money, the auditor said, look, is $10 million. a $10 million grant. when you're deali
, a discussion about google operations and antitrust laws. >> almost 20 years ago, we broadcast one of the most controversial stories in our 44 years on the air. it was called yes, but is it art? i was accused of being a philistia, someone lacking the esthetic ability to appreciate contemporary art. in those 20 years, works that i question worth hundreds of thousands of dollars are now worth hundreds of millions. >> what made everybody so that 20 years ago? >> i discovered something that i had absolutely could barely believe -- that when you question someone's taste in art, thanmore personal politics, religion, sexual preference. it is something that goes to the very soul when you say you b ought that? > sunday at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. now, an american enterprise institute panel discussion examining whether google is violating antitrust laws. topics included the market for internet search, and an analysis of google's business model. pedal trade commission chairman john leibovitz has said that the ftc plans to make a decision on whether to take legal action against google by the end of this year
milwaukee and goes to stanford law school is becoming a clerk to supreme court justice robert jackson. tell us a little bit about how that came about, because i want to lead into what you unfold in here having to do with some of his conservativism on blacks and whites. >> guest: right, right. jackson was a, was, i think, seen by then even as a great justice. >> host: uh-huh. >> guest: and he had been the prosecutor at the nuremberg war trials. he'd actually taken time off from the court and gone to nuremberg and been the chief prosecutor and then come back to the court. and so rehnquist graduates from the stanford law school early at the end of 1952. he was, actually, in the class that would have graduated a semester later, but rehnquist finished his work. he was so smart -- >> host: yeah. >> guest: -- he got out early. so he wanted to, he -- it was clear when i was researching through his papers and looking at the diaries that he had actually, that were on deposit with his papers, which were fascinating. he had six notebooks that were filled with his reminiscences and his desires and early
. >> do you believe fundamental any a man or a woman's right to protest? >> yes. it depends on the laws of any nation. all nation's laws are not equal. they differ. in most countries, one way or another, this is allowed under the laws but fundamentally, i do agree, certainly people must be allowed to express their own opinions freely, freedom is part of the essential rights of all nations. >> if that is -- >> no one has the right to take that away. >> if that is the case, why has the daughter of the former president of iran, why has she been imprisoned for protesting against your regime? >> in iran, there is only one regime, so perhaps they are protest against that and in iran, the judicial branch is not under the power of the government, they have their own laws and's what they follow. and we have no interference in that. the government has paved wait four the highest form of freedom of most people. you see people criticize, people sometimes trespass the border lines of proper as a president, i'm not middle of the people of iran, without drawing any borders, without drawing any reed re
to the duties that the sheriff has, the duty to enforce the law, to administer the jails, to lead his deputies by example, to protect victims of domestic violence. the mayor put in really quite a bit of evidence about all the ways in which the subject matter of the sheriff's duties is -- touches on domestic violence, offender rehabilitation, officer discipline, et cetera, things that are affected throughout all of his performance. now, the sheriff argues that since he was elected to office, it should be left to the people to recall him from office, through the recall procedure. but that's really wrong. the san francisco charter, as you know, is the city's constitution. it contains the most fundamental rules and principles that the people have determined for themselves about how they wish to be governed. and one of the ways that the people would like to be governed is they would like to have a process, and have votes -- this process, whereby officials who may have already -- whom they have already elected can be removed from office if they commit official misconduct after the election. and you'
individuals who would rather work for those kinds of things that for hedge funds. or go to big law firms who are only going to help hedge funds in order to do it. we've really in the last 32 of 40 years in the united states have created great legal precedent. now we need to get somebody to start applying it. [applause] >> good evening. i am a graduate of as a new law school. i have my professor. >> looking. >> i want to say that i am the american dream. back came more than 25 years ago to the united states of america. and did not have one ballot in my pocket. i had two kids with me in another one in my belly. i went to smu. i raised my. [indiscernible] and the same time. the first one graduated from as a new law school. the second from harvard law school. smu. the second from harvard. the third one from airports academy. this is the glory of united states of america. [applause] also, i came from a communist romania. i leave half of my life in of free land, and i live half of my life under government control. what you presented today, it's not only dangerous for women because this last point
interestingly, castro says we have a secret law that prohibits us from transferring tactical nuclear weapons to your country. there is no such law, but he tells castro that we have this lot. castro suggests the law should be repealed. can you repeal this law? basically he begged the premier to leave these -- what he thought i was -- what he thought of as the last defense against the united states -- in cuba. but the premier says no, we cannot. all nuclear weapons are leaving cuba. that conversation and his mission is accomplished. what it shows in my view is that two but was -- cuba was a pawn in the game, but now we see that you could have made the crisis much more dangerous. >> the tactical nuclear weapons have been used -- if the tactical nuclear weapons had been used, 100,000 american soldiers would have been killed. >> in 1962 both nikita christoph and john kennedy acknowledged out close they had gone to nuclear war. christoph -- khrushchev agreed to work towards nuclear stability through kennedy's second term. it was never to be. >> one of the publications in the syrian conflict over t
? >> this country has a crime problem. >> not a gun problem? >> no. if you take a look at the gun laws we have, i don't even think president obama is proposing more gun laws. we have good, strong gun laws, we have to make sure -- we have to make sure we enforce our laws. we have laws that aren't being properly enforced. but the best thing to help prevent violent crime in inner cities is to bring opportunity in inner cities. is to help teach people good discipline, good character. that is civil society. that's what charities and civic groups and churches do do help one another make sure they can realize the value in one another. >> you can do that by cutting taxes? >> those are your words, not mine. >> thank you very much, sir. >> that was kind of strange. trying to stuff words in people's mouths? >> it sounds like you're -- >> ryan folks putting the paper in front of the camera and everything. vice presidential nominee paul ryan getting annoyed in this interview with terry camp in flint, michigan. the campaign even after the interview was over still went out of their way to trash the reporter tha
in the town hall audience. randi? >> paul, thank you very much. >>> there are new voters i.d. laws in place now in several states. we'll look at their potential impact on the election process. >>> if you are leaving the house right now. you continue watching cnn from your mobile phone. take us with you. just go to cnn.com/tv. ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn 30-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >>> there are just 24 days left until election day, but still there's some confusion over the actual process. new voter i.d. laws in several states have changed the rules, while other states have seen their laws knocked down or delayed by the courts. so we are focusing on those voter i.d. laws this morning. right now we are focusing on florida. joining me now is florida conservative talk show host bernie thompson. i wanted to ask you -- good morning to you, first of all. >> good morning. >> i want
in battleground states about who gets to vote and how. all morning with we are putting the voter i.d. laws in focus. gang member or home grown terrorist. that is the question in one case. legal editor paul callan breaks it down. >> that is a bunk of malarky. >> debate politics and the eu has a nobel peace prize. we will look at the week that was. turn an entrepreneur's drea. ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. thor's couture gets the most rewards of any small business credit card. your boa! [ garth ] thor's small business earns double miles on every purchase, every day! ahh, the new fabrics, put it on my spark card. [ garth ] why settle for less? the spiked heels are working. wait! [ garth ] great businesses deserve the most rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with double miles or 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? [ cheers and applause ] see life in the best light. [music] transitions® lenses automat
that fossil fuels come with a lot of unintended murphy's law kind of consequences, a lot of things we weren't counting on and that there are indeed better tools to serve a significant number of our needs and purposes than burning more carbon and throwing it up in the atmosphere. >> you have two daughters? >> i have two daughters. >> what are their names? >> my daughter, simone is 23 years old and my daughter, emily, will be 11 in just a couple days. >> now, when they saw you go off, you're going to far places, you're going to dangerous places, you're going to places where friends of yours have perished on those crystal waters. you're going to places where it's cold and, what do they think? how do you justify doing that to them? >> yeah, now you, now you drove the stake through the heart here. it's -- >> no, but look, i saw in your film you rappel over the edge of some of these icy ridges down into what looks like a bottomless gorge. >> yeah, it's terrifying. and i've had a lot of internal struggle over exactly the question you raise. and here's you i answer it. i picture myself when i'm 85
would do something like this. >> cnn legal contributor paul cowl lan says alabama law may come into play in this case down the road. >> alabama also has virtually the identical stand your ground law that florida has. so do you know that the officer in this case can probably say he was -- he felt that he was in danger of his life, and he was standing his ground and shooting? so i'm betting as this proceeds you may see that law that we've heard so much back in the case in florida rear it's ugly head now in alabama. >> the officer involved in the shooting has been put on administrative looeeave until t investigation is complete. >>> to pennsylvania where the state's deputy attorney general and his wife are accused of svrly abusing two children they adoptd. police arrested douglas and kristin barber after the kids had a doctor's visit. investigators say the doctor noticed several fractures on the 18-month-old girl's head and the 6-year-old boy up appeared starved. the couple faces charges of assault and child endangerment. their attorney has not commented. >>> all right. turning to internati
at the school of law since january 1986. she teaches and writes in the area of evidence, constitution law, and women in the law. professor has been named to the mesh law institute and recognized one of the texas top women lawyers. and i also would like to introduce ken lambrecht president and chief executive off of planted parenthood. they are the largest reproductive health care provider in the state and one of the largest in the nation. it's networking of health certainlies merge this fall and they now serve central and north texas including austin, dallas, forth worth, tyler, and waco. planted parenthood have -- each year. planned parenthood in 2005 and brings more than twenty years of leadership experience in the health care industry. finally that brings us our keynote speaker tonight. most of us remember the moment that sandra she testified about seven months ago on the importance of requiring insurance plans to cover con stray seption. the remarks through the radio talk show host rush limbaugh who called her names. but maybe that isn't -- what isn't well known is that mrs. fluke dev
garden doing? >> i don't blame them. the law says if you have more than 50 workers, full-time workers, then you must provide affordable health insurance. of course, calling it affordable doesn't mean it's affordable to you as the employer. it's going up all the time. so they're saying, i'll hire part-time workers. >> bill: so in any restaurant of any size in a mall or olive garden or red lobster, you have a number of shifts, lunch and dinner, you probably going to have more than 50 employees, probably. >> 180,000 employees. >> bill: but i'm saying at every single restaurant. you have the restaurant, you have one in orlando, florida. if you have 50 or more, then you have to buy health insurance from the government under obamacare. >> not from the government. but you either have to go to the government plan or the government makes you buy private health insurance. >> bill: so either the government plan or the private, but you're mandated to buy it? >> or pay a penalty. >> bill: if you don't. >> 2, 3,000 bucks. >> bill: okay. in order to go under the 50, they're giving people part-time w
of massachusetts. while he lowered the tax burden on the people from one of the highest to one of the law were in the united states. that is a major sense of achievement and i admire that and i'm just delighted to be on the ticket with him. governor dukakis and i agree that we ought to have a trade policy for this country. but we've seen this administration more than double the national debt, that they've moved this country from the number one lender nation in the world to the number one destination in the world under their administration. they have not had a faith policy committee of let trade be a handmaiden for the policy objectives of the country. that this country has exported to many jobs and not enough profits. and as i work to pass a trade bill through the united states senate, through roadblocks every step of the way but we passed a trade bill that any country that has full access to the markets we are entitled to full access to their markets. now that means that we are going to stand tough for america and we are going to protect those jobs coming and we aren't a push american product
law office 800 dollars in campaign money to pay for wedding expensss. expenses.the ppea is part of a deal delegate tiffany alstoo pade to settle the two -&pepar with all thh time suspended. years of supervised probation, fflfill 300 hours of community serviceeand pay tte money back to the state. a lawsuit accusing perdue farms of polluting the ayy begins ii federal court todaa. envvronmental groops rallied outsiie the courthouse based ccmpany is being sued for not ppoperlyydisposing of animal waste. the lawsuit names two eastern shooe farmers, alaa and kristin hudson, who were raising chickens for perdue. giants should bb held responsible for pollution by "the family hatsson triall here toddy, didnt run an operation thht was clean and where waste was properly dispossd of, however, ultimately we believe that responsible."b held respoosible" 3 the trial is expected to laat up to thhee weeks and oull groups say it could bankrupt the hudson farm and set a harmfullprecedent for other family farms. a ballimmre &ppolice officer... accused of helping cover up the death of a teenage
women will be delighted about across botswana. according to the law, women and girls are not allowed to inherit property. this left them at the mercy of male relatives. many lost the rights to any prop.. did judge of the high court hearing says law had no place in modern society. >> we very much welcomed the ruling. i think it is a huge step forward, not only in botswana, but throughout the southern half of the region. it is not just botswana that has these discriminatory laws. it is other countries like malawi. this sends a signal hopefully to the region that these kinds of discriminatory laws should no understand. >> discrimination against women exists in many african societies. in uganda, legally married wives are entitled to 15% of the state, with only 1% going to the customary air. the rest goes to the children. in nigeria, the constitution guarantees equality for women. however, women tend to lose property inheritance rights. the ruling in today's case highlights the broader issue of women's rights in africa and there will be many across the continent who will be watching with
" is much law-abiding and much more manipulative and vicious than the joseph holt i know and underhanded. i think one of the things that the film tries to suggest is the federal government largely in the person of edwin stanton and the person of joseph holt basically railroaded poor mary to her death, and without any interest in what the truth was. they determined that she how would hang regardless and they went after her poor mary. and this just isn't the way the assassination trial played out. there was no deal between stanton and holt to make sure that she was convicted an son. it makes him out to a truly vengeful, two-dimensional character and doesn't reflect who he is as i know him. >> during the administration must have been a difficult job. could you sort of expand upon what that job was maybe before the war and the job that he ended up in? >> well, the job the before the war was basically there was one person who had a small office who kept track of whatever sorts of military sense occurred in an army that was 16,000 people strong. right up prior to the war. that's how big the u.s.
, abide by the rule of law, support independence, judiciary's and uphold fundamental freedom. upholding the rights and dignity of all citizens, regardless of faith, ethnicity or gender, should be expected. of course, we look to government to let go of power when their time comes, just as the revolutionary libyan transitional national council did this past august, transferring authority to the newly elected legislature, in a ceremony ambassador chris stevens cited as the highlight of his time in the country. achieving genuine democracy and broad base growth will be a long and difficult process. we know that from our own history. 235 years after our own revolution we are still working towards that more perfect union. so one should expect setbacks along the way. times when some will surely ask if it was all worth it. but going back to the way things were in december of 2010 isn't just undesirable, it is impossible. this is the context in which we have to view recent events and shape our approach going forward. and let me explain where that leads us. since this is a conference on maghreb th
. there were people in legal law firm conference rom, they could get an internet connection. people in starbucks where they could get an internet connection. people working at the kitchen tables around town. and all of a sudden, right around april 1st. bestart moving to the headquarter. this is literally six week aways from the announcement. and this just this big space. bigger than the room. far bigger than the room. three or four times of the size of the room. it was a whole floor of the high-rise building in chicago, and it was just kind of remarkable. we didn't have everybody in. we were slowly bringing people in. literally we were still getting the servers up. we had telephones ringing and people try to answer phone calls. we had e-mail coming in to our e-mail address. we didn't have a system to receive e nail a real way that you would want. we had many coming many. we didn't have budgets. and we had, you know, we had constituency leaders calling our political department because they wanted to have time with the candidate, we had our fundraisers, who had to raise money with the
. many of -- entire law review. wow. the entire law review at your wedding. that must have been the best electric slide ever. the advisor to the nonpartisan debate commission says the organization doesn't care obama attended the wedding more than 20 years ago. he tells usa today, quote, we selected martha because she is a terrific journalist, and she will be a terrific moderator, and we are thrilled to have her. the notion that that affects her ability is not something we have given a moment's thought to. if they are not going to give it a moment's thought, we should give it a moment's thought. can a journalist be objective in something like this? >> of course they can. that's their job. and martha is a good journalist. can we all just stop with e with attacking the -- with attacking the moderators. if she shows a bias tomorrow night, but then, shut up. >> i actually went to that wedding. it was beautiful. it was a beautiful wedding. >> technically you were a bartender. >> everybody in the belt way -- those nerds know how to tip. everybody who lives in the belt way knows each other anywa
as a hero. now officially labeled a violent sex predator under pennsylvania law. before sentencing, he delivered a rambling 50 minute statement. he choked with emotion as he talked about smiling through his pain and he declared himself a victim, repeating claims of innocence he made in a radio station -- a statement on the eve of sentencing. >> in my heart i know i did not do these things. >> a prosecutor called the statement ridiculous. >> the statement today was a masterpiece of banal self delusion untethered from reality without acceptance of responsibility. >> the defense team will appeal the conviction. >> we would have had an opportunity to prove his innocence. >> you abuse the trust of those who trusted you. the former coach was convicted on 45 counts of child sexual abuse on 10 young boys he met through the second mile, his territory for underprivileged youth. his victims confronted him in the courtroom. we both know what happened. you should be ashamed of yourself. i have notid here thi arrived but i have not left. >> the cases and how far from over. the prosecutor says this i
dozen states had laws against interracial marriage. >> narrator: he would not see his son for ten years. >> barry obama had a pretty unsettling childhood. i mean, he didn't know his father. his mother was very loving and protective, but she was also finding herself. basically, he and she grew up together. >> she then became involved with an indonesian and married him and had a child with him. so she had two biracial children from different cultures who she raised largely by herself. >> narrator: they lived in jakarta. he was now called barry soetoro. his stepfather lolo was troubled. >> he's drinking quite a lot. there's evidence of at least one act of domestic violence against her. >> narrator: stanley ann taught english. while she worked, barry had to learn how to cope. >> imagine what it would be like at age six to be thrown into the chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where
this old house and senate which is unrepresentative with the what the country has just voted making laws you know that are contrary to what the new house and senate are going to do? i think most likely for all the fears and lord knows we will cover it on cable news, of a fiscal cliff my guess is just that they will put it off. >> and we do see the likelihood of a deal to make a deal as they are saying but there are two complications to that. there is one incentive for the markets day by day and there will be a lot of incentive to reassure the markets but the two, the two impediments to that, one the white house intends to play real hardball. they feel by putting it off, they loose their leverage and they do not plan to just extend all that, punk all that. there is going to be a fighter for that and second of president obama wins, paul ryan is going to be back in the house. he probably will be running for president in 2016. if paul ryan is back and running for president he is not going to want to make a deal that sees raising revenue, raising taxes and the conservatives will listen to him
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 551 (some duplicates have been removed)